What’s the Difference Between a Manager and a Leader?

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When aliens land on earth in the movies they never say, “take me to your manager.” But why not manager? Aren’t leader and manager synonyms? I mean, my boss leads my department, so she must be my leader. Just what exactly is the difference? In an ideal situation managers are leaders. But when it’s not, here are five differences between a manager and a leader. 1) Managers Manage the Tasks at Hand. Leaders Lead Towards the Future. Managers are focused on getting the current job done. That’s fine—it needs to get done. But a leader is looking at the big picture. He or she asks the tough questions, such as: How does this task lead towards the quarter’s goals? How does this fit into the company’s overall plan? How does this help prepare the employees for their future career goals? 2) Managers Supervise People or Tasks. Leaders can be Individual Contributors. There are people managers and project managers. Each has a defined set of responsibilities. Sometimes a leader doesn’t have a big title, and it’s just the person that everyone looks up to for guidance and direction to be an individual contributor. This person embodies leadership and people naturally follow....
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Nonprofit Salary Report and Nonprofit Staffing Trends

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PNP’s NonProfit Salaries and Staffing Trends Report reflects a positive and aggressive hiring outlook for nonprofits. For the second year in a row, program growth is the primary reason for anticipated staff increases in 2018, followed by turnover and replacing retirees. 80% of respondents said they plan to recruit new staff in 2018, as compared to 57% who reported that they added staff in 2017. Issues overwhelmingly revolved around the importance of recruiting and keeping good people who can successfully deliver services and mission. A majority of respondents noted that they would prefer to stretch their organization’s budget to hire a more experienced, high performance employee, rather than hire a competent worker with less experience but stay within budget. A significant finding in this year’s survey is that, more than ever, senior executive management positions in nonprofits are filled by women. PNP’s CEO Gayle Brandel notes that the survey also reflects “a growing presence of Millennials in leadership roles, with around half of the respondents reporting that Millennials now hold senior leadership positions.” The survey shows that several essential best practices are critical for nonprofits to be successful in finding and keeping talented staff in a competitive market. Eight best...
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[Podcast] How to Integrate Findings from PNP’s 2018 Salary Report into Your Nonprofit

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PNP’s Managing Director Brandi Scott and Chris Egan, Director of Client Services, share thoughts on how you can incorporate findings from the 2018 NONPROFIT SALARIES and STAFFING TRENDS REPORT in your nonprofit organization. Amy DeVita, Managing Partner & COO of TopNonprofits, leads the way with this engaging podcast as these professionals share their sector knowledge and experience in nonprofit staffing. You’ll learn: How to handle salary discrepancies The balance of salary vs. other benefits in compensation The importance of training and professional  development How to get—and keep—the best talent in a competitive marketplace  
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Amazing Staff Speaking Here

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Everyone I know prefers to be successful and treated fairly. I’ll go out on a limb and bet that holds true of the people you know, too. “Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness” are principles upon which our country was founded. They are the values that have been taught to us since we were young. So why would anyone think that should change when entering the doors of an office? Those who work in the nonprofit sector tackle some pretty big goals: feed the hungry, shelter the homeless, share the arts, protect the earth — the list is quite endless. Some pretty amazing nonprofit professionals share their tips about workplace expectations, and how leadership and staff can work together better. Clean Up Toxic Cultures Bad bosses can make the staff physically sick. In How a Bad Boss Can Make You Sick, Forbes contributor Amy Rees Anderson cites a study where 77% of employees actually experienced physical symptoms of stress from toxic workplaces. What happens when someone is out sick? More work for the rest of the staff. If that’s not bad enough, ongoing toxic behavior at the office can creep into personal lives and spread like a virus. Please...
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Before you start planning how to have a great next year, think about what you can do now to finish off the year strong.

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It’s no secret that nonprofits are experiencing a very competitive marketplace. Talented candidates have a lot of opportunities coming their way whether they are actively job searching or not. If you have a job opening now or have planned to hire in the first quarter, why wait? To be able to hire great people, nonprofits must always be on the hunt for talent. When found, jump, because there’s no guarantee that another organization isn’t one step ahead of you. Being near year end is not going to sway a good candidate from contemplating new opportunities. Many candidates would prefer to accept—and even start—a new job prior to the holidays. This provides the time to get training and acclimation behind them so they are up to speed when the clock is counting toward deadlines and goals. Investing in the right talent produces the best return. Anything less is a waste of valuable operating resources. Waiting to fill an existing vacancy incurs enormous risk. Vacancies cause lost productively, overwork for other staff, and the potential loss of key stakeholder relationships or new funding. The average job search for a professional position now averages 3 months.   If you are confident with this...
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