Use of Nonprofit Temps is Trending up

Over 80% of nonprofits use temporary staff, regularly and in a variety of ways. In the for-profit sector, 96% of corporations use Temps often and regularly to manage their workforce needs. The use of temporary staff by nonprofit organizations is trending up, so we took a look at the reasons why. Just as with for-profit companies, the unemployment rate is very low and the difficulty of finding qualified talent has increased. Nonprofits are finding that hiring Temps can be very cost-effective, especially when the salary budget line is tight. Temps offset the problems associated with being short-staffed, such as work not being done, grant-driven projects not completed on time, lost donor relationships, and lack of full program development and delivery. Not hiring temporary staff during staff vacancies can negatively affect the bottom line of an organization. Using Temps enables an organization to choose from a broad group of diverse candidates to meet immediate, specific, long and short-term needs. This access to talent gives even small nonprofits access to an extensive range of skills and experience that they may not otherwise be able to afford when hiring a full-time, permanent hire. Nonprofit Temp Pay Scale We analyzed Temp rates for 60...
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What It Takes to Recruit and Retain Top Talent

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Have you ever found yourself in a situation where you made a job offer, the candidate accepted, and then quit, before the first day of employment rolled around?  If so, you aren’t alone. The 2018 Nonprofit Salaries & Staffing Trends Report from PNP Staffing Group shares that a remarkable 36% of nonprofits surveyed found themselves in this predicament last year. As if it couldn’t get worse, 33% of the survey respondents said they had a candidate accept, start on the job, but then resign within the first three months of employment. So what’s causing the problem? As the economy has improved hiring has catapulted, resulting in a candidate driven market. Individuals are entertaining more job offers, whether they are job hunting or not. The result is very competitive marketplace for talent. Nowhere is this more evident than in the Association sector. Associations are nonprofits, with a 501(c)(6) instead of the more widely known 501(c)(3) designation. In PNP’s Association Salaries and Staffing Trends Report, a startling 79% of respondents said that they were concerned, or somewhat concerned, about competition for talent. That’s a lot of worry about finding and keeping good employees. The result is salaries are rising. When asked, “If...
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Hiring the Right Development Professional

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Job interview concept with business cv resume With few exceptions, no hire is more important to a nonprofit organization than the individuals tasked with keeping the money flowing: the development team. Yet, the average length of employment for a development professional is 277 days. A study from CompassPoint and the Evelyn and Walter Hass, Jr. Fund found that 25% of respondents with development directors on staff had fired their most recent development director. Half of chief development officers plan to quit within 2 years. So what goes wrong? Quite often, it is a lack of understanding by the Executive Director as to differing fundraising skill sets and how a development professional gets the organization to goal. Development professionals, like physicians, are either generalists or specialists. Generalists have an overall understanding of all aspects of fundraising while a specialist has a laser-like focus on particular revenue streams. Understanding the difference is important—in experience, focus, pay—and results. Those who fill Director of Major Gifts, Director of Corporate & Foundations (Institutional Giving), Director of Special Events, and Director of Membership roles are considered Development Specialists. Development Generalists are those who fill Chief Development Officer, Director of Development, Development Officer, and Grants Writer roles....
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Leadership traits every great executive director should have.

It’s been said before and it will be said again: A nonprofit executive director, much like nonprofit staff in general, wears many hats. Except, in the case of the executive director, these hats are especially public and often come with the weight of funding, visibility, and programmatic success heavily attached. The responsibility to lead an organization to success is not one of brevity. Leadership is defined as the ability of one to influence and guide others. Yet, the question of what makes a great leader is somewhat subjective, in part because leadership is just as much a process as it is a set of personality traits. With that said, there are certain hallmarks that are undeniable indicators of leadership that every nonprofit would benefit from finding in an executive director (and staff member). Nonprofit leaders are: Focused on the mission An effective leader keeps the organization focused on its goals and strategic plan, making sure that the board and staff is on target. Leaders set the example for others, demonstrating how to live the brand and work to accomplish a mission, communicating both internally and externally. Visionary Leaders not only consider the organization’s present role, they look down the road...
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How to improve your odds of getting hired in 2018

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Build a personal brand. Everyone has a personal brand. You may not have cultivated it, but it’s there. Most people think of personal brands in terms of followers, likes, blog subscribers, etc. If this is your measurement, time to re-cut the cloth. Building a personal brand is the process of associating your name with particular traits. Check out Why Being a Jack-Of- All-Trades Won’t Help Your Personal Brand, written by Kathy Bloomgarden for Fortune. Increase your EI (Emotional Intelligence). Emotional Intelligence impacts how we see opportunities and challenges, and factors into everyday decisions. It’s no surprise that a study by the U.S. Department of Labor shows that employers are looking for candidates who know how to listen and communicate well—both important aspects of emotional intelligence. With more and more nonprofit employers evaluating EI during the hiring process, it pays to know how your skills rate. David R. Caruso and Peter Salovey, authors of The Emotionally Intelligent Manager, share four of the core skills involved in the Inc. article, How to Increase Your Emotional Intelligence. Manage your LinkedIn presence. Most nonprofit employers include a review of your social media, particularly Facebook and always LinkedIn. There are hundreds, if not thousands of...
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