Category Archive for "non profit"

Top Hiring Strategies in a Competitive Market

Today’s hiring market is more competitive than ever. Unemployment rates are the lowest they’ve been in 17 years – great for the economy but a challenge for associations that need to hire staff to help recruit and retain members. A recent survey of more than 1,500 associations by PNP Staffing Group shows that most associations plan on growing staff this year. Gayle A. Brandel, founder and CEO of PNP Staffing Group, says the findings show a demand for skilled people in such critical areas as membership development, program administration, marketing and communication clearly exceeds the supply. She adds that as baby boomers retire, an increasingly competitive market will make hiring replacements a challenge. In fact, 50% of those surveyed said they lost a desired candidate in 2018 because the salary offer was too low. But Brandel says there are things an association can (and also should not) do to stay competitive: Good Hiring Practices Offer a competitive salary and benefits compensation package. Learn how to tell your employer brand story and why your company is a good environment in which to work. Fill vacancies quickly; don’t let the hiring process drag on. Hire to complement your team, not just the…

6 Steps to Build a Strong Team

Using words like “power” or “success” to describe a company can sometimes make it easy to imagine a cutthroat environment. However, a competitive workplace shouldn’t run on employees’ fear or feel like a real-life Hunger Games. A powerful and successful company operates best and with the most longevity when employees work with a team mentality, each filling a needed role and fulfilling long-term goals. Here’s what you can do to make sure your team is as strong as it can possibly be for your company. 1. Focus on roles. A thorough selection process for picking your team members has greater long-term benefits, even if this means you spend more time recruiting than you’d like to. Hiring someone just to have bodies in the room can harm your team. Companies that do this wind up becoming a revolving door, whether it’s because prospective employees see the role as a temporary landing pad and are less interested in learning, or because you decide later on that they aren’t the right fit. This winds up costing you more money in the long run. Investing your time and money in people who truly specialize in the role your company needs will have immense payoffs later….

When You Need an Interim CFO vs. a Part-time CFO

If you run a startup or a small- to mid-size company, you probably can’t justify hiring a full-time chief financial officer.  But, you do need some level of financial help from an expert, someone who can cast a trained eye on your cash flow, margins, key performance indicators, and overall profit picture while you concentrate on your team and your strategies for growth. If you run a midsize business, you probably have a CFO. But what happens when you have to navigate a period of financial disruption and that CFO isn’t the right person to see you through it? Or your CFO leaves abruptly in the middle of a critical time? In both cases, you need a CFO, just not a full-time one, so the question is, when should you hire an interim (temporary) CFO, or a fractional (part-time) one? First, let’s be clear on the difference. Interim CFO vs. Part-time CFO: What’s the difference? Interim CFOs are finance experts who come in, usually on a full-time basis, typically for one to three months, to help steer a company through a financial crisis, an operations change, preparation for a sale, or the gap between one CFO’s departure and the hiring…

How to Grow Your Development Team the Right Way

Development teams come in all shapes and sizes. From the one-man shop to large-scale operations, you all share one common goal: to raise as much funding as possible so that you can expand the reach of your organization. In order to do that, many organizations get to the point where they have to grow their development teams. In an industry that places a heavy emphasis on lean staffing and efficiency, however, the decision to expand the team is not an easy one to make. Here are four basic steps that can help you determine when to expand and how to prepare for new development team members. Step 1: Assess the State of Your Workload When you feel frustrated and overwhelmed by your to-do list it’s easy to picture how a new team member would be helpful. However, bringing on new people isn’t always the best solution. Elizabeth Eyre and the Mind Tools Team stress it’s just as vital to understand when not to hire as when to hire. Here are some of the things they say you should consider when you assess the hiring needs of your organization: Does your extra workload have anything to do with seasonality, one-time projects, or the temporary absence of a…

How to Compete for Talent When Hiring Association Executives

Associations have shown overall growth in staffing this year, and have plans for further growth in 2019. This growth is accompanied by salary increases, heightened emphasis on performance in setting salaries, and plans for program expansion and membership development, as reported in PNP’s  newest Association Salaries and Staffing Trends report. As Associations grow and either replace or add talent to their team, they are finding that competition for talent is fierce. Associations overwhelmingly see the transformations in the marketplace for talented staff affecting their ability to replace departing leaders or to bring on talent that will fill leadership roles in the future. A startling 79% of respondents to PNP’s survey noted that they are concerned about the scarcity of new talent to hire. How organizations approach diversity in hiring, Millennials’ mobility, and staff engagement have become critical factors to recruitment, hiring and retention. Salary still remains the single most important attractor of talent, followed by additional benefits, flexible work schedules, and support for training and professional development. 4 Tips to Help You Recruit and Retain Top Talent Prioritize, build and reinforce a team culture of engagement and ownership Invest in coaching and training and offer clear opportunities for professional growth…

3 Tips for Working Effectively with Temp Staff

Nonprofits often hire temps during peak periods for fundraising, event management, and the inevitable financial reconciliation that follows. Contract staffing is also used on a project-by-project basis to access talent that might not exist within the organization. If you use or are considering using short-term staff, here are 3 tips for success. 1. Be open about your culture. What’s the pace in your office? Is it a collaborative environment with strong teams and active managers? Helping short-term staff understand the organization’s culture and processes enables them to manage their responsibilities more effectively. 2. Be specific about the work to be performed. The best relationships happen when you provide absolute clarity about required skill sets and desired outcomes. When your expectations are clear, it’s easier for individuals to hit productivity and to quickly fit into the flow. 3. Onboard your temp staff well. The best way to reduce a learning curve is to communicate—no matter how short or long the employment period. Tell your current employees that you are bringing in temporary help, and make certain that you have assigned a manager to oversee the work. Temporary staffing is a go-to option when looking to fill skills gaps, handle unusually high…

How to Make an Employee’s First 90 Days Successful

How to Make an Employee’s First 90 Days Successful Onboarding is vital to the success of the new employee and your business itself. Here are specific steps to make an employee’s first three months fruitful. When a new employee reports to their first day on the job, the feeling is quite similar to those first day of the school year jitters we all had as kids. And while it’s a challenge for the employee to familiarize him or herself quickly with the office, the job responsibilities, new co-workers and more, it’s just as important and stressful for their managers. Making a new hire feel comfortable and a part of the team from day one is imperative to make the employee a successful and productive member of your business. “Most companies drop the ball early on,” notes Jon Picoult, founder and principle of Watermark Consulting, a Connecticut-based consultancy that helps businesses inspire their employees by making them brand advocates.  “Imagine you’ve been wooed throughout an entire recruiting process, and then you show up on your first day and the receptionist isn’t even expecting you or your office isn’t set up. What are you going to tell your spouse when you go…

Use of Nonprofit Temps is Trending up

Over 80% of nonprofits use temporary staff, regularly and in a variety of ways. In the for-profit sector, 96% of corporations use Temps often and regularly to manage their workforce needs. With the use of temporary staff by nonprofit organizations trending up, we took a look at the reasons why. Just as with for-profit companies, the unemployment rate is very low and the difficulty of finding qualified talent has increased. Nonprofits are finding that hiring Temps can be very cost-effective, especially when the salary budget line is tight. Temps offset the problems associated with being short-staffed, such as work not being done, grant-driven projects not completed on time, lost donor relationships, and lack of full program development and delivery. Not hiring temporary staff during staff vacancies can negatively affect the bottom line of an organization. Using Temps enables an organization to choose from a broad group of diverse candidates to meet immediate, specific, long and short-term needs. This access to talent gives even small nonprofits access to an extensive range of skills and experience that they may not otherwise be able to afford when hiring a full-time, permanent hire. Nonprofit Temp Pay Scale We analyzed Temp rates for 60 key…

Leadership traits every great executive director should have.

It’s been said before and it will be said again: A nonprofit executive director, much like nonprofit staff in general, wears many hats. Except, in the case of the executive director, these hats are especially public and often come with the weight of funding, visibility, and programmatic success heavily attached. The responsibility to lead an organization to success is not one of brevity. Leadership is defined as the ability of one to influence and guide others. Yet, the question of what makes a great leader is somewhat subjective, in part because leadership is just as much a process as it is a set of personality traits. With that said, there are certain hallmarks that are undeniable indicators of leadership that every nonprofit would benefit from finding in an executive director (and staff member). Nonprofit leaders are: Focused on the mission An effective leader keeps the organization focused on its goals and strategic plan, making sure that the board and staff is on target. Leaders set the example for others, demonstrating how to live the brand and work to accomplish a mission, communicating both internally and externally. Visionary Leaders not only consider the organization’s present role, they look down the road…

How to improve your odds of getting hired in 2018

Build a personal brand. Everyone has a personal brand. You may not have cultivated it, but it’s there. Most people think of personal brands in terms of followers, likes, blog subscribers, etc. If this is your measurement, time to re-cut the cloth. Building a personal brand is the process of associating your name with particular traits. Check out Why Being a Jack-Of- All-Trades Won’t Help Your Personal Brand, written by Kathy Bloomgarden for Fortune. Increase your EI (Emotional Intelligence). Emotional Intelligence impacts how we see opportunities and challenges, and factors into everyday decisions. It’s no surprise that a study by the U.S. Department of Labor shows that employers are looking for candidates who know how to listen and communicate well—both important aspects of emotional intelligence. With more and more nonprofit employers evaluating EI during the hiring process, it pays to know how your skills rate. David R. Caruso and Peter Salovey, authors of The Emotionally Intelligent Manager, share four of the core skills involved in the Inc. article, How to Increase Your Emotional Intelligence. Manage your LinkedIn presence. Most nonprofit employers include a review of your social media, particularly Facebook and always LinkedIn. There are hundreds, if not thousands of…