Category Archive for "non profit"

How to Compete for Talent When Hiring Association Executives

Associations have shown overall growth in staffing this year, and have plans for further growth in 2019. This growth is accompanied by salary increases, heightened emphasis on performance in setting salaries, and plans for program expansion and membership development, as reported in PNP’s  newest Association Salaries and Staffing Trends report. As Associations grow and either replace or add talent to their team, they are finding that competition for talent is fierce. Associations overwhelmingly see the transformations in the marketplace for talented staff affecting their ability to replace departing leaders or to bring on talent that will fill leadership roles in the future. A startling 79% of respondents to PNP’s survey noted that they are concerned about the scarcity of new talent to hire. How organizations approach diversity in hiring, Millennials’ mobility, and staff engagement have become critical factors to recruitment, hiring and retention. Salary still remains the single most important attractor of talent, followed by additional benefits, flexible work schedules, and support for training and professional development. 4 Tips to Help You Recruit and Retain Top Talent Prioritize, build and reinforce a team culture of engagement and ownership Invest in coaching and training and offer clear opportunities for professional growth…

3 Tips for Working Effectively with Temp Staff

Nonprofits often hire temps during peak periods for fundraising, event management, and the inevitable financial reconciliation that follows. Contract staffing is also used on a project-by-project basis to access talent that might not exist within the organization. If you use or are considering using short-term staff, here are 3 tips for success. 1. Be open about your culture. What’s the pace in your office? Is it a collaborative environment with strong teams and active managers? Helping short-term staff understand the organization’s culture and processes enables them to manage their responsibilities more effectively. 2. Be specific about the work to be performed. The best relationships happen when you provide absolute clarity about required skill sets and desired outcomes. When your expectations are clear, it’s easier for individuals to hit productivity and to quickly fit into the flow. 3. Onboard your temp staff well. The best way to reduce a learning curve is to communicate—no matter how short or long the employment period. Tell your current employees that you are bringing in temporary help, and make certain that you have assigned a manager to oversee the work. Temporary staffing is a go-to option when looking to fill skills gaps, handle unusually high…

How to Make an Employee’s First 90 Days Successful

How to Make an Employee’s First 90 Days Successful Onboarding is vital to the success of the new employee and your business itself. Here are specific steps to make an employee’s first three months fruitful. When a new employee reports to their first day on the job, the feeling is quite similar to those first day of the school year jitters we all had as kids. And while it’s a challenge for the employee to familiarize him or herself quickly with the office, the job responsibilities, new co-workers and more, it’s just as important and stressful for their managers. Making a new hire feel comfortable and a part of the team from day one is imperative to make the employee a successful and productive member of your business. “Most companies drop the ball early on,” notes Jon Picoult, founder and principle of Watermark Consulting, a Connecticut-based consultancy that helps businesses inspire their employees by making them brand advocates.  “Imagine you’ve been wooed throughout an entire recruiting process, and then you show up on your first day and the receptionist isn’t even expecting you or your office isn’t set up. What are you going to tell your spouse when you go…

Use of Nonprofit Temps is Trending up

Over 80% of nonprofits use temporary staff, regularly and in a variety of ways. In the for-profit sector, 96% of corporations use Temps often and regularly to manage their workforce needs. With the use of temporary staff by nonprofit organizations trending up, we took a look at the reasons why. Just as with for-profit companies, the unemployment rate is very low and the difficulty of finding qualified talent has increased. Nonprofits are finding that hiring Temps can be very cost-effective, especially when the salary budget line is tight. Temps offset the problems associated with being short-staffed, such as work not being done, grant-driven projects not completed on time, lost donor relationships, and lack of full program development and delivery. Not hiring temporary staff during staff vacancies can negatively affect the bottom line of an organization. Using Temps enables an organization to choose from a broad group of diverse candidates to meet immediate, specific, long and short-term needs. This access to talent gives even small nonprofits access to an extensive range of skills and experience that they may not otherwise be able to afford when hiring a full-time, permanent hire. Nonprofit Temp Pay Scale We analyzed Temp rates for 60 key…

Leadership traits every great executive director should have.

It’s been said before and it will be said again: A nonprofit executive director, much like nonprofit staff in general, wears many hats. Except, in the case of the executive director, these hats are especially public and often come with the weight of funding, visibility, and programmatic success heavily attached. The responsibility to lead an organization to success is not one of brevity. Leadership is defined as the ability of one to influence and guide others. Yet, the question of what makes a great leader is somewhat subjective, in part because leadership is just as much a process as it is a set of personality traits. With that said, there are certain hallmarks that are undeniable indicators of leadership that every nonprofit would benefit from finding in an executive director (and staff member). Nonprofit leaders are: Focused on the mission An effective leader keeps the organization focused on its goals and strategic plan, making sure that the board and staff is on target. Leaders set the example for others, demonstrating how to live the brand and work to accomplish a mission, communicating both internally and externally. Visionary Leaders not only consider the organization’s present role, they look down the road…

How to improve your odds of getting hired in 2018

Build a personal brand. Everyone has a personal brand. You may not have cultivated it, but it’s there. Most people think of personal brands in terms of followers, likes, blog subscribers, etc. If this is your measurement, time to re-cut the cloth. Building a personal brand is the process of associating your name with particular traits. Check out Why Being a Jack-Of- All-Trades Won’t Help Your Personal Brand, written by Kathy Bloomgarden for Fortune. Increase your EI (Emotional Intelligence). Emotional Intelligence impacts how we see opportunities and challenges, and factors into everyday decisions. It’s no surprise that a study by the U.S. Department of Labor shows that employers are looking for candidates who know how to listen and communicate well—both important aspects of emotional intelligence. With more and more nonprofit employers evaluating EI during the hiring process, it pays to know how your skills rate. David R. Caruso and Peter Salovey, authors of The Emotionally Intelligent Manager, share four of the core skills involved in the Inc. article, How to Increase Your Emotional Intelligence. Manage your LinkedIn presence. Most nonprofit employers include a review of your social media, particularly Facebook and always LinkedIn. There are hundreds, if not thousands of…

Nonprofit Salary Report and Nonprofit Staffing Trends

PNP’s NonProfit Salaries and Staffing Trends Report reflects a positive and aggressive hiring outlook for nonprofits. For the second year in a row, program growth is the primary reason for anticipated staff increases in 2018, followed by turnover and replacing retirees. 80% of respondents said they plan to recruit new staff in 2018, as compared to 57% who reported that they added staff in 2017. Issues overwhelmingly revolved around the importance of recruiting and keeping good people who can successfully deliver services and mission. A majority of respondents noted that they would prefer to stretch their organization’s budget to hire a more experienced, high performance employee, rather than hire a competent worker with less experience but stay within budget. A significant finding in this year’s survey is that, more than ever, senior executive management positions in nonprofits are filled by women. PNP’s CEO Gayle Brandel notes that the survey also reflects “a growing presence of Millennials in leadership roles, with around half of the respondents reporting that Millennials now hold senior leadership positions.” The survey shows that several essential best practices are critical for nonprofits to be successful in finding and keeping talented staff in a competitive market. Eight best…

5 Traits to Look For in Every Job Candidate

Hiring can make or break a company. Here’s how to identify the most talented employees. Getting the right people on the bus is one of the most important responsibilities of a leader. More than anything else, hiring the best talent gives an organization a competitive advantage. This is why CEOs should own recruiting, participate in hiring as much as possible, and ensure everyone understands how to identify the best candidates for the company. As a CEO who has interviewed thousands of candidates over the years, here are the five traits I believe you should look for in every candidate you hire. Exceptionalism Does the candidate have a history of being exceptional? Exceptional candidates contribute much more to the company than the basic job responsibilities. How do you identify exceptionalism? People who are exceptional have a history of being exceptional. If the candidate is a recent university graduate, you may think it will be difficult to evaluate his experience, but you can still look for signs of greatness. Exceptional candidates were usually exceptional at a young age. They were captains of teams, won speech contests, or ran businesses while getting degrees. They were stars in some way. They have learned how…

Red Flags That You Might Be Getting Fired

An employee at a nonprofit organization in Alexandria once shared that her agency had recently moved into new quarters. However, there didn’t seem to be enough desks for everyone, and the boss was sitting in the reception area. It wasn’t until she was told that she was fired that she realized that the company had never intended for her to make the move with them. The boss just couldn’t face up to firing her before moving day. Here are some common signs that you’re about to get fired: You’re not meeting goals. Try not to be paranoid about this point. Employers often discover they simply don’t have the “right person in the right seat” yet, and reassign responsibilities to better tap into your talents. But if you’ve been continually missing deadlines, goals, or other performance measurements, something is bound to happen. This is a good time to be proactive and approach your boss for an honest discussion. Explain that you are aware of the issue, value your role with the organization, and talk about options for improvement, reassignment, etc. This is far better than waiting it out to see what happens. You are asked to train someone to do your…

Why The Best Leaders Are Full-Time Learners

By Kelsey Meyer Tell me something you’ve learned recently. It’s a question we ask in most interviews to determine whether a candidate has the intellectual curiosity we look for in team members. If she can’t tell me anything she’s learned in the last month, I know it won’t be a good long-term fit, simply because an eagerness to learn isn’t inherent. Last year, I wrote an article titled “Why Leaders Must Be Readers,” and while I still wholeheartedly believe this, my thinking was too limited. Reading is just one way to learn. Leaders must be learners. It doesn’t have the same ring to it, but it’s just as important. I respect leaders who are continuously learning because I know they’re challenging their own assumptions and bringing more knowledge to the table each time we converse. Learning can take many different shapes, so here are a few examples of ways that you can continuously be learning as a leader — and encouraging your team to do the same. Read Not to beat a dead horse, but reading really is important. Read the opinions of others, and discover the ways in which you agree or disagree. Debate topics you’ve read about with…