Category Archive for "Nonprofit Jobs"

Hiring at Nonprofits: How to Stop Missing out on Top Talent in a Candidate-Driven Market

The last 12+ months have demonstrated significant description across virtually every job market, including the nonprofit sector. Many nonprofits, struggling to keep their operations afloat amid global pandemic turbulence and economic downturns, reduced their workforce. Others maintained existing staff but were unable to bring in additional resources during the market upheavals. As a result, most nonprofits across multiple mission verticals assumed a “do more with less” mentality as they waited out a prolonged stretch of hiring uncertainty.  Staffing Industry Data Shows Hiring Trends Are on the Upswing Recent statistics suggest that the hiring waiting game may finally be over. Data released in The Palmer Forecast predicts a 45% increase in demand for temporary workers in Q2 2021 — with further signs of recovery ahead. Additionally, the U.S. The Labor Department reported that in March 2021, nonfarm payroll employees rose by 916,000, a significant increase over the original estimate of 618,000 jobs. Other industry reports predicted that staffing revenue in the U.S. will grow by 11% in 2021 to reach almost $135 billion — finally surpassing pre-pandemic levels in 2019.  Hiring in a Candidate-Driven Market Challenges Nonprofits Competing for the Same Talent The recent hiring shifts in the nonprofit sector make it highly likely that…

Success at Work, Wherever Work Is

The global pandemic has forever changed the way U.S. employees work. Remote work was an established business model before COVID-19 became part of our everyday vernacular. However, the last 14+ months have reinforced just how successful a remote work environment can be — even for companies that once resisted letting their staff members work from home. A recent Forbes article, 5 Statistics Employers Need to Know About The Remote Workforce, outlined several compelling reasons why remote may have turned the corner from alternative option to mainstream method. Some statistics outlined in the article include: 74 percent of workers surveyed expect remote work to become a standard option 61 percent or staff polled prefer being fully-remote 97 percent of employees don’t want to go back to working in their office full-time The Forbes report also noted that having a remote work option currently serves as the biggest draw for attracting top talent. The article doesn’t indicate whether those polled were looking for full-time or partial at-home environments. However, it does show that today’s job seekers want at least the option of working remotely when looking for a new opportunity — or they will elsewhere. The Current Candidate-Driven Job Market Means U.S. Workers…

The 3 Non-Negotiable Attributes All Employees Want from their Workplace

The paradox of recruitment challenges persisting — and indeed worsening — during a period of stagnating market growth has never been more evident than today. Despite grim global economic predictions and the soaring cost of living, all kinds of employers are finding it harder than ever to attract and hold on to the right talent. As quickly as they are bringing new hires through the front door, disillusioned and disengaged employees are slinking off out the back. For some it’s because they are burnt out, still ill from COVID-19, determined to reset their work-life balance, retire early, or start fresh somewhere new and less expensive. For others, the salary gap is the issue they can no longer ignore. The rising costs of energy, fuel, groceries, mortgages, rent and just about everything else means they can no longer accept a pay scale that seems to be tipped the wrong way in the context of rampant inflation. Whatever the reasons, where in “normal conditions” the average staff turnover each year is 20%, today it’s running at 30%, which suggests that something is very wrong. Even those who stay, for fear of being without an income as the threat of recession looms, are…

Competing for Talent: Tips for Associations

The nonprofit workforce is the third largest of U.S. industries and at last count, this included over 93,000 trade and professional associations employing over 1.2 million people. Nearly 1 in 10 workers in Washington, DC alone are employed by associations. The cost of hiring and firing any employee is astronomical when counting the expense of time spent and the psychology of a failed choice. Between the cost of onboarding, training, coaching, staff time, wasted salary, benefits, and administrative costs, HR professionals project that an organization can easily spend thousands of dollars on a hire that has gone wrong. So how do you get it right? Here are 9 Tips for How Associations Can Improve the Hiring Process. 1. Think about your short and long-term organizational strategy. Before you conduct your first interview or draft a job description, think about your short and long-term organizational strategy. How does the new employee fit into this vision?  Are you drafting a profile for the past, or hiring toward the future? 2. Be honest about the hurdles the prospective employee will need to overcome to achieve the goals. Be brutally honest about the obstacles and opportunities that lie ahead. Don’t shy away from asking…

COVID-19 Back-to-Work Checklist for Nonprofits

Returning employees to the workplace during and after the COVID-19 pandemic will not be as simple as announcing a reopening or return-to-the-workplace date, and carrying on business as usual. Not only will many nonprofit workplaces be altered initially, some changes may be long term, even beyond the imagined “finish line” of a widely available vaccine or treatment. The details of each nonprofit employer’s plan to return will look different, but there are 10 key issues most will need to understand and starting preparing for now. 1. Workplace Safety Employers must ensure their workplaces are as safe as they can be. Employees and customers alike may have fears of returning to business as usual; preparing for and communicating how safety is a top priority will allay fears and increase brand loyalty. Safety measures might include: Implementing employee health screening procedures. Developing an exposure-response plan conducive with CDC guidelines, including: Isolation, containment, and contact tracking procedures. Stay-at-home requirements. Exposure communications to affected staff. Providing personal protective equipment (PPE) such as: Masks, gloves, face shield, etc. Personal hand sanitizer. Detailing cleaning procedure and procuring ongoing supplies. Establishing physical distancing measures within the workplace: Staggered shifts and lunch/rest breaks. Rotating weeks in the office…

The New Normal: Nonprofit Staffing During the Pandemic

COVID-19 is reshaping nonprofits nationwide, particularly in staff management. Driven by urgency and necessity, organization are exploring and implementing staffing strategies for survival, recovery, renewal, and growth. To examine how nonprofits are dealing with staffing issues as they head into late 2020, PNP Staffing Group conducted a survey of a wide range of organizations to ask about action steps nonprofits are taking at this time. Because the good work of nonprofits is performed by people, PNP’s focus in the survey was on staff changes and challenges brought about by the pandemic. The survey reflects the ways in which organizations are acting on new and innovative uses of technology, developing different kinds of training programs for staff, and creatively re-writing policies, practices and procedures for talent management. Nonprofits are clearly not expecting an eventual return to the way things were. New ways of working, necessitated by the effects of COVID-19, are being put in place and will continue to evolve as organizations rebuild. For mission-driven organizations, the pandemic has caused, and is continuing to drive, significantly different approaches to staff management. The challenges for nonprofit organizations, going forward, center on how best to do their vital work, differently. Download the executive…

Can You Avoid Nonprofit Burnout?

Sometimes there’s a story we tell collectively. When nonprofit colleagues were asked for their candid suggestions on how to avoid burnout, they got right to the core. Having worked in the trenches in some way with each of these pros reconfirmed for me that there’s nothing like the camaraderie and resourcefulness of those who work in this sector. We can’t do it alone, but we can certainly get through the demands and unexpected challenges of this work with dignity, recognition, and zeal. 10 Tricks to Avoid Burnout: Stay on mission. Remind yourself of the organization’s purpose and keep your eye on the prize. A long-time development colleague shares that her team shares “mission moments” at each monthly staff meetings. “With all the complaints, hustle and bustle of the day-to-day work,” she says, “it brings us back around to ‘why we do what we do’. You remember the reason you are here and picked this job.” Protect your private time. It’s inherent–you will work seven days a week sometimes. “You have to be realistic about what kind of work load you can handle, and actually make sure you take time off, away from the job, to focus on friends and family,”…

4 Must-Do Tips for Getting a Nonprofit Job in 2019

Build a personal brand. Everyone has a personal brand. You may not have cultivated it, but it’s there. Most people think of personal brands in terms of followers, likes, blog subscribers, etc. If this is your measurement, time to re-cut the cloth. Building a personal brand is the process of associating your name with particular traits. Check out Why Being a Jack-Of- All-Trades Won’t Help Your Personal Brand, written by Kathy Bloomgarden for Fortune. Manage your LinkedIn presence. Most nonprofit employers include a review of your social media, particularly Facebook and always LinkedIn. There are hundreds, if not thousands of professional LinkedIn coaches to help you build or improve your LinkedIn profile and posts. For the cost of a few hours, it is well worth the investment in your career. Entrepreneur published a great infographic full of helpful pointers for DYI: 18 Tips to Create Your Perfect LinkedIn Profile. Optimize your resume for ATS. Many nonprofits and recruiting firms are now using applicant tracking systems (ATS). This means that most likely, 3 out of 4 resumes are never read by an actual person. You can increase your odds of being that special one by inserting the critical keywords often found…

9 Tips for How Associations Can Improve Hiring Practices

The nonprofit workforce is the third largest of U.S. industries and at last count, this included over 93,000 trade and professional associations employing over 1.2 million people. Nearly 1 in 10 workers in Washington, DC alone are employed by associations. The cost of hiring and firing any employee is astronomical when counting the expense of time spent and the psychology of a failed choice. Between the cost of onboarding, training, coaching, staff time, wasted salary, benefits, and administrative costs, HR professionals project that an organization can easily spend thousands of dollars on a hire that has gone wrong. So how do you get it right? Here are 9 Tips for How Associations Can Improve the Hiring Process. 1. Think about your short and long-term organizational strategy. Before you conduct your first interview or draft a job description, think about your short and long-term organizational strategy. How does the new employee fit into this vision?  Are you drafting a profile for the past, or hiring toward the future? 2. Be honest about the hurdles the prospective employee will need to overcome to achieve the goals. Be brutally honest about the obstacles and opportunities that lie ahead. Don’t shy away from asking…

How to Make an Employee’s First 90 Days Successful

How to Make an Employee’s First 90 Days Successful Onboarding is vital to the success of the new employee and your business itself. Here are specific steps to make an employee’s first three months fruitful. When a new employee reports to their first day on the job, the feeling is quite similar to those first day of the school year jitters we all had as kids. And while it’s a challenge for the employee to familiarize him or herself quickly with the office, the job responsibilities, new co-workers and more, it’s just as important and stressful for their managers. Making a new hire feel comfortable and a part of the team from day one is imperative to make the employee a successful and productive member of your business. “Most companies drop the ball early on,” notes Jon Picoult, founder and principle of Watermark Consulting, a Connecticut-based consultancy that helps businesses inspire their employees by making them brand advocates.  “Imagine you’ve been wooed throughout an entire recruiting process, and then you show up on your first day and the receptionist isn’t even expecting you or your office isn’t set up. What are you going to tell your spouse when you go…